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25 Years

Teaching Faculty & Visiting Scholars

Teaching Faculty

Asher, Nina

Teaching Faculty 

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Research Interest: Postcolonialism, feminism, globalization, critical perspectives on multiculturalism, and Asian American studies in education

Brown, Karen

Teaching Faculty 

Director, ICGC

Director of Graduate Studies and Senior Lecturer, Development Studies and Social Change Graduate Minor Program

MDP Program Co-Chair

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Karen Brown is Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Global Change (ICGC), where she directs a number of international and interdisciplinary education and research programs including the ICGC Scholar and Mellon Scholars fellowship programs and a partnership with the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa.  Dr. Brown co-chairs the Master of Development Practice degree program in international development studies with the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, serves as the Director of Graduate Studies and teaches in the ICGC Development Studies and Social Change (DSSC) Ph.D. minor program, and also serves as a Graduate Faculty member in Feminist Studies, the Human Rights Program, and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Her past positions include Assistant Vice President for International Scholarship (2012-2015) in which she directed the University’s system-wide Global Spotlight grants program to support international and interdisciplinary research and Special Assistant for International Scholarship in the Global Programs and Strategy Alliance. Dr. Brown earned her Ph.D. in Political Science (University of Minnesota) with concentrations in International Relations and Comparative Politics. She also earned an M.A. in East Asian Studies (University of Minnesota) and a B.S. in Chinese (Georgetown University). Her academic interests focus on gender and public policy in global context, international women's and children's human rights, girls in international policy, and international research ethics and methods.

Selected publications:

“Gender and International Relations.” In Oxford Bibliographies in Political Science. Sandy Maisel, ed. New York: Oxford University Press, forthcoming.

“The Rise of Interdisciplinarity:  Implications for Promoting Advanced Specialized Knowledge at Public Research Universities,” with Karri Holley, in Re-Envisioning the 21st Century Public Research University. Robert H. Bruininks, Robert J. Jones, Andrew Furco and Kateryna Kent, eds. New York:  Routledge, forthcoming.

“Women’s Rights are Human Rights,” in Restructuring World Politics:  Transnational Social Movements, Networks and Norms.  Sanjeev Khagram, James V. Riker, and Kathryn Sikkink, eds. University of Minnesota Press, 2002.

Courses taught:

Global Survey of Gender and Public Policy

Doctoral Research Workshop

Scholarship and Public Responsibility

Gender and Citizenship

Research Interest: feminist international relations, gender and politics, international human rights, international research ethics

Fleischman, Forrest

Teaching Faculty 

Assistant Professor

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Research Interest: Natural resource and environmental policy & politics, democratic governance, forestry, South Asia, Mesoamerica

Hartmann, Douglas

Teaching Faculty 

Research Interest: sociology of sports, race relations, popular culture, social theory

Johnstone, Christopher

Teaching Faculty 

Research Interest: Inclusive education, development internationalization of higher education, intersection of diversity, equity, and internationalization

Powers , Jennifer

Teaching Faculty 

Associate Professor

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Research Interest: Tropical forest ecology, climate change, seasonally dry tropical forests, forest restoration, conservation

Wilsey, David

Teaching Faculty 

Program Director, MDP Program

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David Wilsey is the Program Director for the Master in Development Practice (MDP) program, which is co-administered by ICGC and the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Dr. Wilsey’s research and practice focus on development of integrated natural resource conservation and livelihood programs, generally focusing on forest-and farm-based livelihood systems. He is particularly interested in the role of non-timber forest products in food and livelihood systems and the development of market-based interventions to support livelihood and lifestyle goals.

Dr. Wilsey joined the MDP program in 2013 as the program coordinator and a lecturer. Prior to joining the program, he spent five years as an associate Extension professor & educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Center for Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Sciences. His Extension work focused on three themes: natural resource based livelihood systems, non-timber forest products, and cross cultural program development. Dr. Wilsey was situated within the forestry program area, his work extended to other areas and he established productive collaborations with the small farms team, community vitality and economics, family resource management, and the American Indian leadership team, of which he was an active member. Though his interests are broad ranging, over the course of his career Dr. Wilsey primarily worked with forest–based and forest–oriented groups in the Americas: in Minnesota, several states in Mexico, Guatemala, and Ecuador. He finds the opportunity to expand this portfolio to include other themes and regions to be a great privilege of working with the MDP program.

Research Interest: Sustainable livelihood systems, integrated conservation and development strategies, non-timber forest products, and food systems research

Visiting Scholars

Longford, Sam

Visiting Scholar

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Sam Longford is a final year PhD candidate and coordinator of the Remaking Societies, Remaking Persons (RSRP) Forum at the Department of History, UWC, and a Centre for Humanities Research Fellow. His PhD thesis is titled, ‘The Untimely Deaths of Chris Hani: Discipline, Spectrality, and the haunting possibility of return’, and is grounded by a sustained engagement with public history and different philosophies of history and of social change. This thesis focuses on the contested ways in which former General Secretary of the South African Communist Party (SACP), Chris Hani, who was assassinated in 1993 just before South Africa’s first general election, is remembered and memorialised today, and what these invocations mean for both thinking through the transitional period from apartheid to democracy, and the ANC’s postapartheid project. As well as his work at UWC, Sam is a co-founder of The Commons, a collaborative and experimental space which seeks to build an inclusive platform for the arts in and around Muizenberg, Cape Town.

Sam is in virtual residency with ICGC during the Spring 2021 semester. 

Setai, Phokeng

Visiting Scholar

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Phokeng Setai is a research fellow in the Centre for Humanities Research and a doctoral candidate in the department of Anthropology at the University of the Western Cape. In his doctoral research, Setai explores the evolution of curatorial practice as an independent field of cultural production on the African continent. His study is conducted by means of investigating the strategies that Black-African curatorial practitioners incorporate in the discursive and applied articulation of their practices in the form of exhibition-making, publication or institution-building. He draws from his ethnographic research on the lives and practices of three prominent Black-African curatorial producers to understand how their praxes have influenced modes of cultural production emerging out of the African art world in the present day. Setai holds a Master’s degree in Sociology from the University of the Free State, under a program called The Narrative Study of Lives​ . He is co-founder of ​About00Time​ , a digital cultural work initiative founded while doing archival research in the Mayibuye Archives at the University of the Western Cape. ​About00Time, ​ which makes use of artifactual and cultural archives to speculate and probe the possibilities of new cultural imaginaries into the contemporary, will be releasing its first book publication - ​Creativity Under Confinement - ​ in the second quarter of 2021. This collaborative book project, of which Setai is co-editor, was conceptualised during the early stages of the global lockdown in 2020. Phokeng is also co-founder of the ​Mutha_Ship Landing​ , an artistic project space located in Salt River, Cape Town, whose aim is to offer Black-African artistic and cultural producers a space for dialogue, experimentation, collaboration and knowledge production. Lastly, Setai works part-time as a research assistant at Zeitz MoCAA, Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, located in Cape Town, South Africa,  where he currently lives and works.  

Phokeng is in virtual residency with ICGC during Spring semester 2021. 

Walters, Lee

Visiting Scholar

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Lee Walters is a doctoral candidate at the University of the Western Cape’s Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. Majoring in Arts Culture and Heritage Management, Lee holds a Master of Arts in Cultural Studies from the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. Lee previously worked as a researcher, curator and manager in various cultural industries organisations and continues to contribute to the works of several arts collectives in the continent. Her most recent formal work engagements include programme manager for music at Pro Helvetia Swiss Arts Council, Southern Africa; general manager for Moshito Music Conference and Exhibition in South Africa; and curator for the experimental youth arts programme at UJ Arts, University of Johannesburg. Lee is currently a fellow at UWC’s Centre for Humanities Research and National Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences scholarship recipient.

Lee is in virtual residency with ICGC during the Spring 2021 semester. 

See a list of Past Visiting Scholars.