25 Years

Love and Revolution II: Considering the Limits and Possibilities of Nationalist and Postcolonial Thinking

Date: 
Thu, 03/31/2011 - 8:00am to Sat, 04/02/2011 - 5:00pm
Event Location: 
University of Minnesota

Nationalist struggles since the 1960s, certainly in Africa, suggest the transformation of individual subjectivities in the midst of political struggle and social change. More generally, there are deployments
of revolutionary language to express the personal, and narratives of affect to lay claim to the political and the economic. It would seem that “love” is a knowledge-producing event. There are shared revolutionary texts and affect across territories, oceans and continents, producing transnational political-affective communities. But in transitioning from the colonial to the postcolonial, is there a loss of the revolutionary subject? Do forces such as structural adjustment, neoliberalism, the end of the Cold War and colonialism bring an end to revolution and maybe love, leaving a sense of abandonment, a nostalgia for retrospectively defined affective bonds, and for the homosocial worlds of resistance?

These issues have emerged from the reading group and conference entitled Love and Revolution initiated at the University of the Western Cape in 2010. Love and Revolution II: Considering the Limits and Possibilities of Nationalist and Postcolonial Thinking is a continuation of this conversation and the first conference gathering of a new ongoing ICGC research circle, entitled Transnational Knowledge Production, at the University of Minnesota.

This conference is convened in collaboration with the University of the Western Cape and the University of Fort Hare.